Curiously Savage

Curiously+Savage

Jeremiah Bailey, Guest Writer

The Curious Savage is based on the events of a woman teaching her step children a lesson and saving money to help with her husband’s memorial all while being confined inside a insane asylum. Directors Brandy Bonnin and Adam Domingue say this isn’t their first time putting on this play, but they’ve never done it together.

“We’ve never done this show together so we decided to collaborate and put this show on the stage,” Bonnin said.

The Curious Savage wasn’t their first choice for the University Interscholastic League (UIL) one act play. They planned to do another show called Harvest Moon, but complications with the cast caused the directors to make a fast executive decision about an alternative play.

“We weren’t happy with grades so we had to change at the last minute and we had a lot of work to do in a very small time frame,” Bonnin said.

They had a new set of problems some of those being how the actors adapted to the changes and loss of cast members. There are lots of different factors go into casting and having to repeat that process was time consuming and stressful for the directors and actors hoping for another role in the play. Some of the actors found that their characters were different from their acting style.

“I’m a physical actor I use my body a lot and that’s a physical limiter for me,” Jesus Gonzalez, senior, said.

All the actors had their fair share of challenges to create a memorable character that made acting difficult for them and the crew to keep up with the directors who were rushing to keep ahead of the curve.

“The script itself asked for certain sounds. It made the role a challenge… I am very invested in the program and this was my year of opportunity,” Rafael Gonzalez, junior, said.

The cast and crew were very excited to put on this play for the school and for their UIL competition and practiced daily to make sure that they were ready for competition.

“It was kinda drilled into our heads how every motion has to be cause and effect and that has kinda stuck with me,” Raven Higgins, junior, said.

With UIL being a big deal and with all the changes that happened throughout the play selection process, the directors were pushing actors to their breaking points to keep everything on track and finish in time for their competition. They hoped that their  performance would leave the audience savagely excited and curious.

 

Photo by Skitterphoto from Pexels